LOACHAPOKA, Ala (EETV) - With gospel music in the air and the smells of kettle corn and sweets spread around, hundreds gathered in Loachapoka for the annual Pioneer Day festival.

Hosted by the Lee County Historical Society, the large festival was meant to give visitors a glance into the lives of early Lee county residents.

“Overall it’s to show how life was in the late 1800s, early 1900s,” said Lee County Historical Society Board Member Paul Mask.

Many different vendors and exhibitors were scattered throughout the Pioneer Park center and in the fields next the the railroad tracks in downtown Loachapoka. Goods sold included birdhouses, furniture, pocket knives and even sweet potato biscuits.

Organizers and vendors believe the event is a good way to help reach out to the local community while also showcasing the area’s history.

“To me this is kinda special because it does have the crops growing here,” said Mask, “so kids can actually see sweet potatoes pulled up, we got the corn being shelled here, they can take part in it.”

Other vendors also liked how the event allowed visitors to learn more about agriculture and the ways it contributes to everyone’s life.

“A lot of people like to come out to these events,” said Evelyn Greene with the Lee County Cattleman’s Association, “that’s where we reach a lot of the hometown people to show them that we stand up for them as far as their agriculture, as far as the farms and their future food industry.”

Event organizers hope that visitors take away a better sense of their history and some knowledge of what life was like for many early Lee county residents. 



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